Current Repertoire

Ballet 5:8’s repertoire consists of a mix of classical, contemporary and neoclassical works, encompassing both abstract and narrative styles. The information below is pertaining to the 2014-2015 Season. Please see our booking information page if you are interested in hosting a performance. 

Program A

The Four Seasons of the Soul and The Story of Job: When Bad Things Happen to Good People

Our first program opens with Artistic Director Julianna Slager’s electric yet introspective The Four Seasons of the Soul. Set on the company for the first time in the fall of 2014, Seasons uses Vivaldi’s classic reflection on the seasons of nature as a basis for a journey through the complex spiritual life of a Christian believer. The deeply personal work explores the triumphs and failures of a life of faith, modeled by those gone before, in the context of a beautiful and dynamic classical ballet. As is said in Ecclesiastes 3, “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven; a time to be born, and a time to die…”.
In Program A, Seasons is paired with one of Ballet 5:8’s original neoclassical ballets, The Story of Job: When Bad Things Happen to Good People. Since it’s premiere in the winter of 2014, Job has risen as a defining element of Ballet 5:8’s style and repertoire. The 45-minute ballet tackles the Biblical story of Job, a largely tragic tale about a man who was righteous in God’s eyes and yet lost everything, seemingly in the very hands of the God he served. As a ballet, Job is an captivating look at what can happen when today’s choreographers delve into the creation of new narrative works, set in modern times, in a dance world largely dominated by the “classics” from the 1900’s. From a spiritual perspective, the ballet uses Job’s difficult story to challenge audience members to wrestle with one of life’s toughest questions: Why would God allow that to happen? In light of glimpses of heavenly conservations between God and The Accuser, who is allowed to torture Job, we are forced to evaluate God’s character against Job’s great suffering.

Program B

Indwelling, Sigao and The Four Seasons of the Soul

Ballet 5:8’s Program B is a contemporary program including a range of contrasting choreography styles and ideas. Indwelling, which premiered in fall 2013, is a short abstract work that shines a light on the struggle within the Christian soul between good and evil,  between the redeemed “new man” and the old fleshly nature of sin. Sigao, new for the fall 2014 season, is an earthy contemporary work that uses not Christian religion, but the many groups of believers and the corresponding organizations that together make up today’s Christian church as its subject matter.

Finally, Program B will include Ballet 5:8’s electric yet introspective The Four Seasons of the Soul. Set on the company for the first time in the fall of 2014, Seasons uses Vivaldi’s classic reflection on the seasons of nature as a basis for a journey through the complex spiritual life of a Christian believer. The deeply personal work explores the triumphs and failures of a life of faith, modeled by those gone before, in the context of a beautiful and dynamic classical ballet. As is said in Ecclesiastes 3, “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven; a time to be born, and a time to die…”.

Program C

Belteshazzar: A Perilous Tale

Ballet 5:8’s third performance bill this season will be the Spring 2015 premiere of it’s first full-length original ballet, spanning the entire two hours of the program. BelteshazzarA Perilous Tale brings the Biblical story of Daniel to the stage in dramatic proportions. Featuring kings and kingdoms, royal egos, unfathomable dangers and mysterious dreams, the ballet takes audiences to the ancient Middle East for a wild ride alongside the young Daniel and his amazingly unwavering integrity. Set to the fabulous music of Benjamin Britten’s score originally used for Prince of the Pagodas, the ballet Belteshazzar is an important story for us all in a day where standing firm according to our convictions is easier said than done.